Obituaries
submitted by: Julia Johnson - julia.johnson63@gmail.com
 

[APPLETON, JAMES EDWARD]
Maryville Daily Forum (Maryville, Missouri), Monday, August 8, 1932, [p. 1]
J. E. Appleton Dies at Age of 71 in Hopkins
J. [ames] E. [dward] Appleton, age 71, died at 8 o'clock Saturday night at his home in Hopkins. He had been ill about ten days.

Funeral services were held at 2 o'clock this afternoon at the residence, conducted by Rev. J. Howard Thompson of the Methodist church. Burial was in the Hopkins cemetery.

Mr. Appleton was born July 14, 1861, in Greensburg, Ind. He came to Hopkins and settled in that vicinity at the age of 10. Mr. Appleton had lived on a farm west of Hopkins for thirty-four years.

Surviving are his wife, a daughter, Mrs. Arch Stewart, Bloomington, Ind., and a son, Cecil Appleton, Hopkins.

 

[BIGGERSTAFF, WILLIAM, JR.]
Hopkins Journal (Hopkins, Missouri), Thursday, February 22, 1900
Wm Biggerstaff, Jr., died of consumption near Blockton last Saturday and was buried here Monday. He is a son of Wm Biggerstaff who was killed in a well near Sheridan recently and who worked on the section here so long.

 

[BRIDGER, HENRY HASKINS]
Maryville Daily Forum (Maryville, Missouri), Friday, March 11, 1932, [p. 1]
Henry Bridger Dies in Daughter's Home in Hopkins Thursday
Henry Bridger, a retired farmer of Hopkins died at the home of his daughter, Mrs. Elam Mendenhall at Hopkins at 5 o'clock yesterday afternoon. Mr. Bridger was born December 9, 1856 at Henry County, Ill. He has been in poor health for some time but for the past week has been seriously ill.

He is survived by two daughters, Mrs. Mendenhall of Hopkins and Mrs. Blanche Dayton of Pasadena, Calif., and three sons, Irvin Bridger of Fort Worth, Tex., and Elmer and Frank Bridger of Los Angeles, Calif.

The funeral services will be held at 2 o'clock tomorrow afternoon at the M. E. church at Hopkins. Rev. J. Howard Thompson will conduct the services.

 

[BRIDGER, MARTHA C. FLEHARTY]
Hopkins Journal (Hopkins, Missouri), Thursday, February 8, 1900
Obituary
Martha C Fleharty wan born near Springfield, Sangamon county, Ill., April 6, 1829. When four years old her parents removed to Mercer County, being among the first settlers of North Henderson Township. In her 13th year she was converted to God and united with the Methodist Episcopal church. From her conversion to her death she remained faithful to her vows of service for Christ. Her religious experience, thus begun in youth, broadened and deepened with the passage of years, until, joined with those of others who have "washed their robes and made them white in the blood of the Lamb," they swell that "river," the "streams whereof shall make glad the city of our God."

She was married to her now bereaved husband, Thomas W. Bridger, Nov. 15, 1849, near Oxford, Ill. They have since traveled life's journey together in loving fellowship for more than half a century, i.e., 50 years, 2 months and 16 days. To them were born five children, two of whom, Harriet M and Reuben, have gone before to the eternal home. The aged husband, son, Henry H, and two daughters, Mary C. Hammon[d] and Luertia [Lucretia] A Bridger, were at her side and tenderly ministered to her to the last, and together with two brothers, U S and W D Fleharty, and one sister, Mrs Margaret McLaughlin, nine grand and two great grandchildren, are left to mourn for a season. With her family the deceased came to Hopkins, Mo., in 1887, and here, surrounded by those she loved, after a period of the most intense suffering, she passed from earth, Jan. 31, 1900, leaving these last words as her final testimony, "O death, where is thy sting? O grave, where is thy victory?"

Surely we ought not to mourn as those who have no hope, "but rather say with Paul, "thanks be to God, who giveth us the victory, through our Lord Jesus Christ,' and pray, "Let me die the death of the righteous, Let my last end be like His." The funeral was held from the M E church at 2 p m Thursday, and was conducted by the pastor. Rev C J Warner, assisted by Rev Pace of the Baptist church. Interment in our beautiful cemetery.
A Card of THANKS.
To the friends who so long and kindly ministered to our dear wife and mother during her sickness; and to us after her decease, we desire to express our gratitude; but words fail us. You have our grateful love, and we shall always pray that the same God, who was with and so blessed our dear one, may be with and bless you all evermore.   Thomas W Bridger and children.

 

[BRIDGER, RETTA G. KINCAID]
Hopkins Journal (Hopkins, Missouri), Thursday, February 16, 1899
Mrs. Henry Bridger Dead
The citizens of Hopkins were surprised and pained to hear of the death of Mrs. Henry Bridger, which occurred at her home two miles south of town last Tuesday afternoon at 4 o'clock.

Mrs. Bridger took sick with pneumonia about ten days ago. She was a very estimable lady, about 35 years of age, and leaves a husband and five children, the youngest being a boy only 4 years old who was sick in bed when his mother died.

The funeral was conducted Wednesday afternoon at the house by Rev. Warner after which the remains were buried in the Hopkins cemetery. Mrs. Bridger was a consistent member of the Methodist church and was loved and admired by all who knew her. The family and friends have the sympathy of ail in their great bereavement.

 

[CALVIN, MARY EUNICE MCCUNE]
Hopkins Journal (Hopkins, Missouri), Thursday, April 12, 1900
Mrs. R. J. Calvin.
Mary Eunice McUne [McCune] was born in Madison County, Ohio, Feb 2, 1837, and was married to R [obert] M Calvin July 31, 1853, dying at her home in Hopkins, Mo, April 5, 1900, aged 63 years, 2 months and 3 days. Sister Calvin came with her family from Peoria county Ill, to Hopkins in 1882, where she has since lived. She was converted in 1867 and joined the M E church of which she lived a devoted member until her death, so living as to evidence her faith by her life. She leaves a husband, son, two daughters and a brother and sister to mourn her loss.

The funeral services were conducted by her pastor, Rev C H John, at the M E church, Friday, April 6, at 2 o'clock, after which the body was interred in the Hopkins cemetery.

 

[CHANEY, FRANK ALBERT, INFANT OF]
Hopkins Journal (Hopkins, Missouri), Thursday, March 1, 1900
Mr. and Mrs. Frank Chaney have the sympathy of their many friends in the loss of their babe last week. Funeral services were conducted at the house by Rev Warner and interment took place in the Hopkins cemetery.

 

[CHANEY, IRENE OPAL ALEY]
Maryville Daily Forum (Maryville, Missouri), Saturday, January 13, 1973, p. 4
Mrs. Irene Opal - Mrs. Irene Opal Chaney, 81, Maryville, died at 5 p.m. Friday at the Nodaway Nursing Home, Maryville, where she had resided for two and one-half years.

Born May 21, 1891, at Murray, Neb., she was the daughter of the late Columbus and Eliza Maude Cole Aley. Mrs. Chaney was married Feb. 26, 1923, at Maryville to Richard Chaney, who preceded her in death.

A longtime Hopkins resident, Mrs. Chaney was a member of the Wray Memorial United Methodist Church and a past matron of the Hopkins Chapter, Order of the Eastern Star.

Among her survivors is one sister, Mrs. Harry Clayton, Sioux City, Iowa, and several nieces and nephews.

Funeral services will be held at 2 p.m. Sunday at the Wray Memorial United Methodist Church, Hopkins. The Rev. John Shipley will officiate. Burial will be in the Hopkins Cemetery. The body is at the Swanson    Funeral    Home, Hopkins.

 

[CLARK, CHARLES, INFANT SON OF]
Hopkins Journal (Hopkins, Missouri), Thursday, April 13, 1899
The 2 months old son of Mr. and Mrs, Chas Clark, east of town, was found dead in bed by its parents last Thursday morning. The little one had not been feeling well for over a month. Rev. Seelig conducted funeral services at the house Friday and the remains were buried in the Hopkins cemetery. The family desires to return thinks to the friends who kindly assisted during the sickness and burial of their babe.

 

[COLE, FLOYD HARLAND]
Hopkins Journal (Hopkins, Missouri), Thursday, February 16, 1899
Death has again entered our midst and left a family heart broken. Floyd Harland Cole, the infant son of Mr. and Mrs. A. E. Cole, died last Sunday morning, after a week's sickness, aged 11 months and 23 days. He was a bright, sweet baby, the only child, and will be sadly missed in the home. The parents have the sympathy of all in this their hour of great sorrow. The funeral was conducted on Monday by Rev Furgerson at the Christian church after which the little form was laid to rest in the Hopkins cemetery.

 

[COLE, FLOYD HARLAND]
Hopkins Journal (Hopkins, Missouri), Thursday, February 16, 1899
Mrs. Cole's mother, Mrs. Missouri Thayer, of Craig; her sister, Miss Ada Thayer, of St Joe; and her brother, Herbert Craig, a soldier of Ft. Leavenworth, were here to attend the funeral of Mr and Mrs Cole's baby.

 

[CRIGER, PORTERFIELD "DICK"]
Hopkins Journal (Hopkins, Missouri), Thursday, July 6, 1899
"Dick" Criger Dead
P. F. Criger, familiarly known as Dick Criger, died at his home in this city last Sunday at 4 o'clock p. m., after a sickness of nearly seven months with lung trouble.

The funeral was conducted at the house on Monday afternoon by Rev. Seelig after which the remains were laid to rest in the Hopkins cemetery.

Dick was one of the best known and most popular men in Nodaway county. For many years he bought and sold horses in Hopkins and at no time did he have any trouble in his business transaction, being honest and fair with everybody and besides his family he leaves many friends to mourn his death.

Obituary – P. F. Criger was born in Nodaway county, Mo., Jan. 1, 1853 and resided in the same county until his death, July 2, 1899, making him 46 years, 6 months and 2 days old. He was of a family of six children and leaves a wife, two daughters, mother, two sisters and two brothers.

 

[EDGAR, ELIZABETH MCLARNON]
Hopkins Journal (Hopkins, Missouri), Thursday, January 11, 1900
Obituary – Elizabeth McLarnon was born in Antrim county, Ireland, May 4, 1820, and was united in marriage to James Edgar Oct. 2, 1837, and came to Page County, Iowa in 1869. She died at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Jno Campbell, Jan. 11, 1900. The funeral was conducted the next day by Elder Seelig from the Baptist church in Allison, after which the remains were laid to rest in the Allison cemetery. Mrs. Edgar was a kind, Christian lady, loved by all who knew her, and was preceded to the better world by her husband in 1874.

The following are the children: Mrs. Ewers, Kansas City; Mrs. Campbell, Hopkins; Henry Edgar, Shambaugh; Mrs O'Riley, Quitman; James Edgar, Perry, Oklahoma; John Edgar, Deer Lodge, Montana.

 

[FARRENS, THOMAS ALEXANDER, INFANT OF]
Hopkins Journal (Hopkins, Missouri), Thursday, March 2, 1899
The infant child of Mr. and Mrs. T. [homas] A. [lexander] Farrens died Tuesday evening, February 21. The funeral was held at 10 o'clock Thursday and burial was made in Hazel Dell cemetery. ---Clearmont News

 

[FISHER, HATTIE M.]
Hopkins Journal (Hopkins, Missouri), Thursday, February 16, 1899
Died, Feb. 5, at the home of Dan'l Melton in Maryville, Hattie M., the infant daughter of Elvin and Etta Fisher.

 

[HAWKINS, JULIA HENRIETTA WOLFERS]
Maryville Daily Forum (Maryville, Missouri), Saturday, April 15, 1933, [p. 1]
Mrs. Henrietta Hawkins Dies in St. Joseph Friday
Mrs. Henrietta Hawkins, age 80, a sister of E. [dward] C. Wolfers of Hopkins, died at 1:30 o'clock yesterday afternoon in a St. Joseph hospital. Mrs. Hawkins had formerly lived in Hopkins but she moved away from that community about twenty-five years ago. She was born in New York state.

Funeral services will be held at the Twelfth street Methodist church in St. Joseph. The body will be brought to Hopkins at 2 o'clock tomorrow afternoon for burial in Hopkins cemetery. Rev. J. Howard Thompson will conduct the burial rites.

 

[HAWKINS, SAMUEL S.]
Hopkins Journal (Hopkins, Missouri), Thursday, January 25, 1900
Samuel S. Hawkins
Was born July 19, 1832 in Chautauqua county, N. Y., where he grew to manhood. For eighteen years he was connected with the Erie railroad as train dispatcher, but on account of failing health came west in 1874 and worked one year in St. Joseph, going from there to Wyoming where he was employed by the Union Pacific railroad for three years. From there he came to Missouri and for seven years was with Wolfers & Son of this city, going from here to St. Joseph where he died Jan 18, 1900 of heart failure, after an illness of 20 hours. He had been in poor health, however, for three years, and was merely a shadow of his former self when death overtook him.

Services were held at the family residence in St. Joseph on Friday, by Rev. Bullard of the Presbyterian Church and on Saturday the remains were brought here and laid away in the Hopkins cemetery. Mr. Hawkins was a popular man, well liked by all, and besides his wife, leaves many friends to mourn his demise. Mrs. Hawkins is a sister of E. C. Wolfers of Hopkins and Chas. A. Wolfers of Pickering. No children were born to them.

 [HERBERT, NANCY ANN MILLER]
Maryville Daily Forum (Maryville, Missouri), Wednesday, Dec. 24, 1941, p. 8
Mrs. W. C. Herbert Dies
Mrs. W. C. Herbert, 85 years old, who had been a resident of Hopkins all her life, died following a long illness at 2 o'clock this morning in her home in east Hopkins.

Mrs. Herbert, who was Miss Nancy Miller before her marriage, is survived by two sons, Fred and Will Herbert, Hopkins, and four daughters, Mrs. Ella Brown in California; Mrs. Charles Gray, Mrs. Bryan Richey and Mrs. Glenna Weiser, all of Hopkins. Her husband, a son and daughter preceded her in death.

Funeral arrangements have not been completed.

 

[INGRAM, GOODSON MERRILL]
Hopkins Journal (Hopkins, Missouri), Thursday, December 7, 1899
Obituary
  Goodson M [errill] Ingram was born Oct. 26, 1826, in Scott County, Va., and died at his home near Hopkins, Mo., Nov. 27, 1899, aged 73 years, 1 month and 1 day. At the age of 20 he came west and settled in Platt County, Mo., and after five years traveled across the western mountains to California, where he spent six years. Returning to Nodaway County, he resided near Hopkins until the day of his death. He was married Oct 24, 1858, to Miss Sarah E Johnson and to this union sixteen children, fifteen of whom still survive, all but one being present at the funeral services.

Mr Ingram was a remarkably good man. To know him was to love and respect him. He was very quiet and inoffensive, always ready to assist in any benevolent work.

The writer was called to conduct the funeral service, using as a text Numbers 23:10. Many were the friends who gathered to pay their last tribute of respect to the deceased. The interment took place in the Shearer cemetery. The family has the sympathy of the neighbors and friends in their bereavement.  H. K. JOHNSON

 

[JOYCE, MARY FARALL]              [JOYCE, MATTHEW]
Hopkins Journal (Hopkins, Missouri), Thursday, January 19, 1899
A very remarkable case of two old people passing away almost simultaneously is furnished by the death of Mary Joyce on Wednesday evening at 6 p. m. and of Matthew Joyce at 10:30 p. m. Thursday after living together for fifty years. Matthew Joyce was born in Ireland in 1806 being 93 years old at the time of his death, and Mary (Farall) Joyce was 86 years of age when she died. They were married in 1848, came to the United States in 1852, settling in New York state, moved to Illinois in 1856, located six miles southwest of this city in 1875. They have resided in Maryville the past four years. - Maryville   Record.

 

[LINCOLN, WILLIAM ABSALOM]
Hopkins Journal (Hopkins, Missouri), Thursday, December 22, 1898
William Abssolem [Absalom] Lincoln was born April 22, 1815 in Chenango county, N. Y. from which place his parents moved to Alleghany county, N. Y., when he was 2 or 3 years old.   At the age of 16 he went to St. Clare County, Ill. and from there to his home 4 miles west of Hopkins in 1882, where he died of Bright's disease Dec. 12, 1898, being 83 years, 7 months and 27 days old at the time of his death.   He had been ailing for some time but no one thought death was so near.   He was married to Caroline Harmon at Lathrop, Ill., from whom seven children [were born], two of whom died in infancy and five remain—Charles, Elizabeth J., Henry, Heman and Mrs. William Alexander, all   being present   at the time of his death.   He was a member of the Christian church, uniting about 2 years ago. Mr. Lincoln    was a favorite uncle in his father's family, the nephews and nieces making many pleasant visits to "Uncle William's."   He was a kind and affectionate husband and father maintaining   the principles of temperance, honesty and uprightness in his life, and with the help of his estimable companion leaving the impress of these sterling qualities in the minds of his family.   His   was a peaceful and happy life, preferring the quietness of home to the turmoils of business and by honesty, industry   and economy   secured a home and its comforts.   His days were many and peaceful but not without trial, the greatest of which was the loss of his beloved wife who preceeded him but a little over a year ago. He could not forget her and expressed himself only a few days before his death that he would rather see her than any one he knew and how soon that desire should be realized we little know. His death is a sad loss to the family, but to none more than to the faithful daughter who remained in the home and with careful hands lightened the load of increasing years and now to be left alone.

The many friends, feeling that a good man has gone, extend their sympathy to the bereaved in this great loss.

The funeral services were conducted by Rev. Seberal of Pickering in an impressive manner, after which the remains were laid to rest in the Hopkins cemetery by the side of his wife. God be with you till we meet again.  

 

[LOWRY, GEORGE HAMILTON]
Maryville Daily Forum (Maryville, Missouri), Thursday, November 21, 1929, [p. 1]
Hamilton Lowry Dies at Home in Hopkins
Farmer of That Community Succumbs After a Two Years' Illness—Services Not Arranged
Hamilton Lowry, veteran farmer of Hopkins Township, died after a two years' illness at 11:30 o'clock last night at his home in Hopkins. His condition had been serious for about a month. Death was due to paralysis. Mr. Lowry would have been 73 years old December 2.

Funeral arrangements have not been completed.

The deceased is survived by his widow; three daughters, Mrs. Mont Kemery, Bedford, Ia., Mrs. Joseph Turner, Blockton, Ia., and Miss Phoebe Lowry, Maryville; and one son, George Lowry, Hopkins.

Mr. Lowry was born in California, December 2, 1856, the son of Mr. and Mrs. George Lowry. They moved to Illinois and when Hamilton Lowry was 16 years of age came to Nodaway County, settling on a farm near Gaynor. Mr. Hamilton was united in marriage to Miss Laura Cowen, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. William Cowen, February 7, 1883. About twenty-three years ago the Lowry family moved to Hopkins. Mr. Lowry was engaged in the farming industry with James Pistole.

 

[LOWRY, LAURA JANE COWEN]
Maryville Daily Forum (Maryville, Missouri), Thursday, July 20, 1939, [p. 1]
Mrs. Laura Jane Lowry Dies; Funeral Is Friday
Laura Jane Lowry   who has lived in Maryville for the past seven years, died at 6 o'clock yesterday evening at the home of a daughter, Miss Phoebe Lowry, 223 East Fifth street.

Mrs. Lowry had been ill seven months. She was born May 31, 1864 in Green county, Penn., a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. William Cowen. On February 7, 1883, she was married at Hopkins to Hamilton Lowry, who died in 1929.

Surviving besides Miss Phoebe Lowry are two other daughters, Mrs. Mort [Mont] Kemery of Hopkins and Mrs. Joe Turner, Blockton, Ia., and a son, George Lowry, of Hopkins. Two brothers also survive, Frank Cowen, Fort Morgan, Colo., and Melvin Cowen, Talmadge, Utah. There are five grandchildren and one great grandchild.

Funeral services will be held at 2:30 o'clock tomorrow afternoon at the Methodist church at Hopkins. Rev. Paul Barton will officiate. Burial will be in the Hopkins cemetery.

 

[LOWRY, LOTTIE MAUREE GRAY]
Bedford Times-Press (Bedford, Iowa), Thursday, April 5, 1984
Hold Final Rites March 31 for Lottie Lowry, 86
Funeral services for Mrs. George (Lottie Mauree) Lowry, 86, of Hopkins, Mo., held March 31 in Shum-Novinger Funeral Home in Bedford, were conducted by Rev. Carl Cummings. Mrs. Lowry died March 29, 1984 in Bedford Manor, Bedford. Interment was at Hopkins Cemetery, Hopkins, Mo.

Lottie Mauree Gray Lowry, daughter of Sherman Gray and Lizzie Miles Gray, was born at Pickering, Nodaway County Missouri, July 2, 1897. When she was a small girl she moved with her parents to Hopkins, Missouri where she grew to maturity and attended the public school.

On September 21, 1917, she was united in marriage to George Lowry at Maryville, Missouri. They lived in the Maple Grove Community northeast of Hopkins, Missouri where they engaged in farming until retirement when they moved to Hopkins, Missouri. Mr. Lowry passed away February 3, 1980.

Three children were born to bless this home and to share their love: Donald, Elizabeth and Ralph.

She was preceded in death by her husband, her parents, three brothers, a sister, a granddaughter and a son-in-law and daughter-in-law.

Left to cherish her memory are her children: Donald Lowry and his wife, Enola, of Bedford, Iowa; Elizabeth Calvin of Lenox, Iowa and Ralph Lowry and his wife, Lois, of Ashland, Nebraska; ten grandchildren; 13 great grandchildren; other relatives and friends.

Her family and friends will remember her as a kind and considerate loved one and she will be sadly missed by all those who knew her.

 

[MCCARTNEY, MARY A.]
Hopkins Journal (Hopkins, Missouri), Thursday, February 10, 1899
Obituary - Mrs Mary A McCartney, the subject of this sketch, was born in Ireland, county of Derry, April 7, 1810. She came to America in 1840, and settled with her husband in Mercer County, Penn. After a number of years of varying fortune she moved to DeKalb County, Mo., in 1874, where a number of her children had settled. She was the mother of ten children, all living but two. Her life was an eventful one, always looking on the bright side. She has been widowed 36 years. Of late years she has been living with her children, especially, her daughters, Mrs. D. [aniel] D. [avid] Bollinger, of Hopkins, Mo., and Mrs. G. C. Johnson, at Cedar Lawn, west of Argentine, Kansas, at whose residence she passed away, Jan. 16, at 7:30 o'clock, aged 88 years, 9 months, 6 days. She united with the Presbyterian Church at 15 years of age and remained a consistent member of that organization until '86 when she united herself with the Church of God in Stanberry of which organization she remained a consistent member until her death. We can never hear that sweet voice again until we hear it beyond the grave, where we will see her again and where we can live and enjoy her company forever. Thanks to our dear Heavenly Father for giving His only Son to redeem us from the grave. What a gift that is! We can more fully realize it after seeing a loved one laid in the cold silent grave. When our heart seems ready to break, we hear the voice of our Saviour. "I am the resurrection and the life." What a grand, glorious, thing it is to believe those words; how it makes the darkness disappear and the glorious light break into our sad heart. May we live so as to be found worthy (when the grave gives up its dead) to live with mother again.
Ella C Bollinger

 

[MCCORMICK, MARY MAY MILLER]
Maryville Daily Forum (Maryville, Missouri), Saturday, December 31, 1932, p. 3
Rites For Mrs. McCormick
Services Will Be Held In Hopkins Monday Afternoon
The body of Mrs. Mary McCormick will arrive in Hopkins Monday for burial there that afternoon. Mrs. McCormick, who was 74 years old, died Thursday at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Charles McConnell at Twin Falls, Idaho, where she had made her home for the past ten years. Previous to that time she had lived in Hopkins.

Arrangements for funeral services have not been completed but burial will be in Hopkins cemetery. Mrs. McConnell is the only near relative.

 

[MCCORMICK, THOMAS]
Hopkins Journal (Hopkins, Missouri), Thursday, June 7, 1900
Tom McCormick Dead
Thomas McCormick, the well-known east side farmer, died Tuesday night, after a long and painful illness with cancer.

He united with the M E church some weeks ago and the funeral will be held today, conducted by Elder John of this city, after which burial will take place in the Hopkins cemetery.

An obituary will appear next week.

 

[MCCORMICK, THOMAS]
Hopkins Journal (Hopkins, Missouri), Thursday, June 14, 1900
Thos. McCormick – Thomas McCormick was born in Uniontown, Fayette county, Penn., July 27, 1850; died near Hopkins, Mo., June 5, 1900, aged 49 years and 29 days.

Losing his parents at an early age, he came to Iowa when quite young to make his home with the family of his uncle, Jacob Springer. Between him and the members of this family the dearest relationship existed. He was to them as a dear son and brother.

He came to Missouri in October 1883 and was married to Mary M. Miller and settled down on his farm, where he remained until the time of his death. He leaves an absent sister in West Virginia.

Mr. McCormick was a man of noble and generous impulses—true to his convictions of right and wrong. In consequence of continued poor health, he necessarily lived a somewhat secluded life, but he was a man of strong friendships---a friend to him was a friend for life. He was a kind husband and an indulgent father. Home and family to him were objects of almost sacred affection.

He professed faith in Christ as a personal Savior about six weeks before his death and joined the M. E. church. To his near friends he talked freely about his conversion and hope of Heaven. Having set his house in order, he very patiently submitted to his severe suffering until the end.

His pastor, Rev John, conducted the funeral at his home, Thursday, June 7, at 11 a. m. Burial was had in Hopkins cemetery.

 

[MAHAN, MARY ALICE WRAY]
Maryville Daily Forum (Maryville, Missouri), Monday, January 16, 1967, [p. 1]
Mrs. Mary Mahan, 100, Dies at Nursing Home
Mrs. Mary Alice Mahan, 100,died at 8:50 a. m. Sunday at the Black Rest Home. She was a native of Pickering and has resided at Hopkins before moving to Maryville, 15 years ago.

Mrs. Mahan observed her 100th birthday anniversary Sept. 17, 1966. She was born Sept. 17, 1866, at Pickering, and was the daughter of the late Stephen K. and Mary Carmen Wray. She was married to Frank Mahan who preceded her in in death in 1950. She was a member of the Wray Memorial Methodist Church, Hopkins.

Funeral services will be held at 2 p. m. Tuesday at the Price Funeral Home. The Rev. Gerald Sappington will officiate and burial will be in the Hopkins Cemetery.

She is survived by one son, Wray Mahan, Maryville; a daughter, Mrs. Myrle Bugbee, Steele City, Neb.; a sister, Mrs. Florence Monroe, Canoga Park, Cal. Five grandchildren and eight great grandchildren.

 

[MARKLEY, CHARLES F. "CHARLEY"]
Hopkins Journal (Hopkins, Missouri), Thursday, February 9, 1899
CHARLEY MARKLEY DEAD
The Passing of Another Well Known and Popular Citizen

The community was again shocked last Saturday morning to hear of the death of Charley Markley, which occurred at his home in this city at about 5 o'clock.

He had been sick a little over a week with pneumonia, the disease that is so prevalent and proving fatal in so many instances throughout the east and west.

Mr. Markley came to Hopkins twenty-seven years ago and was one of the best-known men in the county. He always took great interest and pride in the town and did what he could for its advancement. Many times he climbed the long JOURNAL stairs to tell us of the large number of teams tied on the public square that we might make an item of the superiority of Hopkins as a trading point; and if he heard of anything he thought would benefit the town in a moral or commercial way, he invariably imparted the information to where it would gain publicity. For a number of years he was leader of the Hopkins band and spent time and money in making the organization a credit to the city, and also took great interest m church and Sunday school work. He was a quiet, reserved man, esteemed by all who knew him, and in his death his family loses an affectionate husband and the town a model citizen.

The funeral was held at the Christian church, on Monday at 1 p. m., conducted by Elder Chapman of Rosendale, who preached an eloquent and touching sermon, after which the remains were interred in the Hopkins cemetery to await the Judgment Day.

The deceased was an honored member of the Fraternal Aid and carried $2,000 insurance in this order. The lodge attended the funeral in a body to pay its last respects to the fallen brother.
OBITUARY.
Charles F. Markley was born in Roscoe, Coshocton County, Ohio, Feb. 19, 1849, and died in Hopkins, Mo., Feb. 4, 1899. When a child his parents moved to Holmes County, Ohio, where he grew to manhood. At the age of 17 years he united with the Christian church of that place. In 1872 he came to Missouri where he resided until his death. In 1875 he was united in marriage with Josephine Ewing, daughter of Capt James Ewing, who survives him. In 1893 he and his wife united with the Christian church of Hopkins, living consistent lives, which gives the remaining one the blessed assurance of meeting her loved companion beyond the grave.

Mr. Markley's mother, two sisters and a brother are still living, his sister, Mrs. Ilam McCoy, of Chicago, being present at the funeral.

 

[MENDENHALL, MARY A. FLUKE]
Hopkins Journal (Hopkins, Missouri), Thursday, January 19, 1899
Mrs. Will Mendenhall died at the home of her parents. Mr and Mrs. Geo. Fluke, northeast of Hopkins, last Friday night after a sickness of about a week with measles. She was only 22 years of age and besides her family leaves a husband to mourn her loss. She was a very estimable young woman and her loss will be keenly felt in the neighborhood. The funeral was preached at Hazel Dell Sunday, by Rev. Warner, after which the remains were laid to rest in the Hopkins cemetery.

 

[MENDENHALL, MARY A. FLUKE]
Bedford Free Press (Bedford, Iowa), Thursday, January 19, 1899, p. 5
---Last Friday night Mrs. Mary Mendenhall died of measles at the home of her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Geo. Fluke, eight miles southwest of town.

 

[MILLER, CHRISTINA FOSTER]
Hopkins Journal (Hopkins, Missouri), Thursday, January 25, 1900
Her Suffering Ended
Mrs Martin Miller, who has been bedfast tor nearly three months with cancer, during which time she suffered the most excruciating pain, died at her home in Hopkins, Jan 23, 1900, at 1 p. m., aged 55 years and 18 days.

She was conscious until after 11:30 Tuesday night, and at her request the Baptist choir sang comforting hymns by her bedside during the evening, while the Baptist minister, of whose church she was a member, offered words of encouragement. Those who heard "Nearer My God," "Bear me Away on Your Snowy Wings" and other sacred songs float out from the room where the dying woman lay, appreciated the solemnity of the occasion and had great sympathy for the loved ones who sat with tear-stained faces around the room.

Mrs Miller's maiden name was Christina Foster and she was united in marriage to Martin Miller in 1866. To this union five children were born, Mrs Wm Myers, Hopkins; Mrs Enos Younker, St Joseph; Jos Miller, Hopkins; Mrs J M Slaybaugh, St Joseph, and Mrs Florea Lowe, of Nebraska, all being here but the last named.

Mrs Miller was born in Taylor county, Iowa, and had resided in Hopkins over 18 years, where she made many friends.

The funeral will be held today at 11 a. m. from the Baptist church, conducted by Rev Pace, after which burial will take place in the Hopkins cemetery.

The bereaved husband and children have the sympathy of the community in this their hour of great sorrow.

 

[MILLER, JOHN WYATT "JOHNNY"]
Hopkins Journal (Hopkins, Missouri), Thursday, February 16, 1899
Died Suddenly
Uncle Johnny Miller, one of the oldest residents of Hopkins, died very suddenly last Thursday.

He had been ailing for sometime with the grip, but on the morning of his death was feeling better and partook of a hearty breakfast. Soon after the meal he died in his chair from heart failure.

The funeral was conducted at the house on Friday by Elder Seelig, the burial taking place in the Hopkins cemetery.

John Wyatt Miller was born in Kentucky in 1823 and served both in the Mexican and Civil wars.

He was an honest, upright citizen and became somewhat famous in this section as a cancer doctor.

He leaves a wife and six children, the children living here being John and Richard Miller and Mrs. Chet Herbert.

 

[MOBLEY, CHARLES LEROY "ROY"]
Hopkins Journal (Hopkins, Missouri), Thursday, April 20, 1899
Resting in Jesus
  Charles Leroy Mobley was born Feb. 28, 1894, and died April 12, 1899. For ten long weeks he suffered untold agonies but his little mind seemed unnaturally bright and he was conscious till the last. A short time before he died he pointed his little finger and said, "I want to go up there." His mama asked him where? He answered, "up there," repeating it a number of times. Jesus said, "Suffer little children to come unto me," and he certainly showed himself to this little lamb. The little body was laid away in the Hopkins cemetery, till the same Good Shepherd shall call it to come up there and be united for all eternity. The bereaved parents and friends have the sympathy of the community in their loss, but they grieve not as those who have not a hope of a happy reunion bye and bye.

 

[OXLEY, VIOLA BROYLES]
Clarinda Herald Journal (Clarinda, Iowa), Thursday, October 27, 1938, p. 10
Mr. and Mrs. Chas Broyles and Mrs Ellsworth Thompson and daughter, Genevieve, attended the funeral of Mrs. Viola Oxley at Hopkins Sunday afternoon. Mrs. Oxley formerly resided in this community but of late years has been at the home of her sister in St. Joseph where she passed in the great beyond last Thursday.

 

[OXLEY, WILLIS S.]
Maryville Daily Forum (Maryville, Missouri), Tuesday, February 25, 1936, p. 3
Willis Oxley of Hopkins, Age 75 Year[s], Is Dead
Willis Oxley of Hopkins, 75 years of age, died at 9 o'clock last evening at the home of Mrs. Oxley's sister, Mrs. Morris Lindsey, in St. Joseph. Mr. Oxley had been ill at the Lindsey home since the first of September.

Born at Siam, Ia., in January of 1861, Mr. Oxley had lived all of his life near Siam and Hopkins. He was a member of the Masonic lodge at Siam.

Funeral services will be held at 2 o'clock tomorrow afternoon at the Methodist church in Hopkins, conducted by Rev. C. M. Kennaugh. Burial will be in the Hopkins cemetery and the services will be in charge of the Hopkins Masonic lodge.

Surviving Mr. Oxley, besides the widow, is a sister, Mrs. Ida Appleton of Hopkins, and a brother, George Oxley, of Chillicothe.
[Note: His Missouri State Death Certificate gives his birth date as 1860.]

 

[OXLEY, WILLIS S.]
Clarinda Herald Journal (Clarinda, Iowa), Thursday, March 5, 1936, p. 6
Willis Oxley – Willis Oxley, well known in the Siam vicinity, passed away February 24 at the home of his sister-in-law, Mrs. Mattie Lindsay, in St. Joseph, Mo., after an illness of more than a year. Funeral services were held at Hopkins Wednesday afternoon, being in charge of the pastor of the Methodist church at Hopkins, Rev. Kennaugh.

Mr. Oxley was a fifty-year member of the Siam Masonic lodge and prominent in other activities of the community. He was born near Siam seventy-five years ago the 15th of this month and the last fifty-four years had resided on the farm he still owns, 4 miles west of Hopkins, being one of the prominent and well-known men of this section. He was an ardent republican and took an active part in the councils of the party until his health failed.

Besides the wife, he leaves one sister, Mrs. Ida Appleton of Hopkins, and one brother, George N. Oxley, of Chillicothe, Mo., besides other relatives and many friends.

Mrs. Oxley is in very poor health, being unable to be here for the funeral.

The roads made it impossible for the members of Plum lodge of Siam to attend the funeral, so Masonic rites were held at the grave by the Hopkins lodge. Pallbearers were Frank Mahan, W. G. Shinabarger, H. C. Clutter, Petis Lewis, Robert Cox and Roy Bebout.

 

[STOCKTON, DORA L. MOREHOUSE]
Hopkins Journal (Hopkins, Missouri), Thursday, January 11, 1900
Mrs. Oliver Stockton Dead
Mrs. Dora Stockton, nee Morehouse, died at her home southwest of Hopkins Wednesday morning of consumption, aged about 20 years.

She was a daughter of J [ames] Wellington Morehouse and had been married less than a year, making death the sadder. She was a kind and affectionate girl and her loss is a sad blow to the husband, and a great loss to the community where she resided.

The funeral will be held today at 11 o'clock and burial will take place in the Morehouse cemetery.

 

[STOCKTON, DORA L. MOREHOUSE]
Hopkins Journal (Hopkins, Missouri), Thursday, January 25, 1900
Obituary – Dora L. Morehouse was born in Nodaway County, Missouri, June 8, 1875 and was united in marriage to Oliver Stockton August 23, 1899. She died at the home of her parents, Mr. and Mrs. J [ames] W [ellington] Morehouse, Jan 17, 1900. The funeral was conducted by Elder Kenan from the Christian church, after which the remains were laid to rest in the Morehouse cemetery.

 

[THOMPSON, DANIEL "DAN"]
Hopkins Journal (Hopkins, Missouri), Thursday, April 26, 1900
"Uncle Dan" Thompson Dead
Daniel Thompson, familiarly known as "Uncle Dan," died while sitting in his chair at his home in the edge of Hopkins last Monday afternoon, aged 82 years.  He had been complaining for years, but had been worse during the past few weeks and it was known that he could not much longer survive.

Uncle Dan was an old timer here, having settled in Nodaway County forty-five or fifty years ago. While he was a very eccentric man, he was a good, substantial, honest citizen, respected by all who knew him. His wife died about five years ago and the relatives he leaves is a daughter, Mrs Jno C McMaster, a son, Keller, and a large number of grandchildren and several great grand children.

The funeral was conducted on Tuesday at the Baptist church of which he was a member by the pastor, Rev Soeten, of New Market, Iowa, and burial took place in the Hopkins cemetery.

The deceased left considerable property and as he had made so many different wills, it is thought those interested will pay no attention to any of them, but get together and divide up the property as if no will had ever been made.

 

[THOMPSON, DANIEL "DAN"]
Hopkins Journal (Hopkins, Missouri), Thursday, May 3, 1900
Obituary - Daniel Thompson was born   in Roanoke County, Kentucky, March 22, 1818 and departed this   life   April   23, 1900, in Hopkins, Mo., aged 83 years, 1 month and 1 day.

At the age of eight   years he, with his parents, moved to Owen county, Indiana; was married to Louisa Handcock [Hancock] July 18, 1839, who has preceded him to the haven of rest. To this union was born four children, three sons and one daughter, two sons having gone before, and two children survive-- Keller Thompson and Mrs. Sarah McMaster.

He was converted and united with the Baptist church in 1845. For several years he was a resident of Taylor Co., Iowa, and during this time he was a member of the First Baptist church of Bedford. For twenty-one years he has been a resident of Nodaway County, and during this time he was a member of the Hopkins church. "Uncle Dan," as he was familiarly called, was an honest, upright citizen and his hope was in Christ, who is our righteousness.

Funeral services were conducted April 24 at 2 p. m., by Rev J Soetens at the Baptist church. Text, Job 14:14. Remains ware buried in the Hopkins cemetery.

 

[TOOHER, MICHAEL "MIKE"]
Hopkins Journal (Hopkins, Missouri), Thursday, April 1, 1897
Dropped Dead
Michael Tooher, a well-known resident of this county, living three miles southwest of Hopkins, dropped dead last Thursday. He had been a sufferer for years with dropsy but thought he was getting much better, so his death was a severe shock as well as a surprise to the community. "Mike" Tooher was known far and near as an honest, upright man and his death will cause a vacancy hard to fill. He leaves a wife and four grown children, three boys and one girl, to mourn his loss. He was a Catholic and was buried Friday by that church in Maryville.

 

[WELLS, SIBBY ANN HANKS]
Hopkins Journal (Hopkins, Missouri), Thursday, March 9, 1899
Obituary – Sibby A. [nn] Hanks was born in Edgar county, Ill., May 6, 1834 and died at her home near Hopkins, Mo., Feb. 28, 1899, aged 64 years, 9 months and 22 days. She was married to William T. [homas] Wells in November 1857. The husband with four children, Lee A., Mary A. [lice], Elmer C. and Mrs. Rosy Hook, survive her. The deceased was a consistent member of the Church of Christ, was an affectionate mother, a loving wife and a kind neighbor. Elder Wm Cobb preached the funeral sermon and the interment took place in the New Hope cemetery.

 

[WELLS, SIBBY JANE HANKS]
Hopkins Journal (Hopkins, Missouri), Thursday, March 21, 1899
Died Suddenly
Mrs. W. W. Wells died very suddenly at her home northeast of Hopkins last Tuesday morning.

It seems she was as well as usual the morning she died and was out milking when she received a stroke of paralysis and died about two hours later. Dr. Sargent was sent for but she was dead before he got there.

Mrs. Wells was a highly respected lady, about 65 years old and leaves a husband, several children and an army of friends to mourn her loss.

The funeral was held at the Allison church on Wednesday at 2 o'clock.

 

[WORLEY, MARY JANE]
Hopkins Journal (Hopkins, Missouri), Thursday, March 23, 1899
Mary Jane Worley was born April 13, 1898, and died March 15, 1899, aged 11 months and 2 days. She was the infant daughter of John W. and Lizzie L. Worley. The funeral was held March 16 at one o'clock at the Baptist church, conducted by Rev. Cooper, of Bolckow, after which the remains were laid to rest in the Hopkins cemetery.